Anxiety and Panic Attacks

I finally found the time and state of mind to write about this big issue. I have been writing quite openly about my mental health since I started this blog but I promised I would also talk about anxiety and panic attacks management.

I don’t have any qualification or authority to talk about mental health however, I am someone who suffered from anxiety and panic attacks and therefore I feel like I can talk about my own experience and what I have learnt.

As mentioned in previous articles, my mental health has always been up and down since my diagnosis. I was taking medication such as antidepressant and Xanax and I used to suffer from periods of breakdowns and panic attacks.

I took antidepressants on two occasions: first time immediately after my diagnosis and second time in January 2016 after a very low point around the time of annual MRI. I stopped taking the medication completely in May 2016.

In September 2016, I had quite a difficult time and faced a series of very unpleasant panic attacks. That is also when I decided to take action and significantly change my patterns.

Panic attacks are completely normal and many of us will experience them at least once in our lifetime. Problem is if they start to take over our lives or happen very frequently.

Panic-Attack-circle

Panic attack circle. Picture source.

I am not going to bore you with a lecture on panic attacks. There is abundant info online.

Here are some useful links:

Mind.org.uk – information and support

Wikipedia – Panic attack

BBC – Difference between anxiety and panic attacks

NoPanic.org.uk

panic_attack_symptoms-1-768x581

Symptoms. Picture source.

Panic attacks come in different forms and shapes. Mine were usually demonstrated by shortness of breath, tight chest, fear of choking and an unidentifiable and overwhelming fear, probably of dying. Often, when in public, I felt nauseated, scared of vomiting and not being able to eat.

There are certain steps and options one ought to take when experiencing panic attacks. Different things work for different people. As there is a number of various anxiety management methods that work for me, I will talk about each one of them individually.

First on the list: letting go.

In the next article.

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